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Posts tagged with Confluence

Consider 4 Things Before Choosing a PDF Exporter for Confluence
Nils Bier

Nils Bier on May 19, 2017

Nils Bier

Nils Bier on May 19, 2017

Consider 4 Things Before Choosing a PDF Exporter for Confluence

Confluence is a leader in the content collaboration tool space, allowing entire organizations to access and contribute to information within a single centralized knowledge hub. Sometimes however, Confluence users need to export this documented knowledge as PDFs to fulfill business requirements. Here are four important factors to consider before choosing a Confluence PDF exporter.

The Millennial Future of TechComm
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on May 11, 2017

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on May 11, 2017

The Millennial Future of TechComm

No one knows what the future of technical writing looks like. You can however get a pretty good idea if you have a look at the characteristics and philosophies of the people who are newly entering the profession. As a teacher of technical writers, I get to see generation Y in action all the time and perhaps my observations about their ideas and reactions to different editorial systems are an indicator of what is to come.

Feedback, Please! - Part 2: Building a Web Help Platform to Get the Crowd Involved
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on September 3, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on September 3, 2015

Feedback, Please! - Part 2: Building a Web Help Platform to Get the Crowd Involved

“No one reads documentation, and nobody gives feedback on it.” This phrase is bad news for technical communicators – but it’s not the whole story. What actually happens in reality hinges on the way we manage and distribute technical content. (Protip: Host it on the web and invite everyone to get involved). This is the second part in our blog post series https://www.k15t.com/blog/2015/07/feedback-please-why-technical-writing-shouldn-t-be-a-one-way-street about the benefits of crowd-enabled documentation using a collaborative approach. In this post you’ll learn how to get readers’ feedback on documentation easily by building collaborative web-based help content that allows technical communicators to elevate the quality of their work to the next level.

Feedback, Please! - Why Technical Writing Shouldn't Be a One-Way Street
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on July 2, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on July 2, 2015

Feedback, Please! - Why Technical Writing Shouldn't Be a One-Way Street

For a long time, technical writing was like driving down a one-way street. We’ve sent information into one direction, and nothing came back. But since the age of the Web 2.0, this approach is no longer a best practice. Today, being a technical writer means to communicate and to interact with everyone involved – including our readers. Building documentation heavily depends on feedback, and it’s an iterative process – more like a traffic circle. New processes require new technology – it’s time to move from publishing tools to collaboration platforms. This blogpost is part of a series about feedback in technical communication, In this article, read why receiving feedback is crucial to create helpful technical content and how a web-based collaboration platform can enable both internal feedback and customer feedback.

One Page Template, Multiple Languages
Nils Bier

Nils Bier on April 22, 2015

Nils Bier

Nils Bier on April 22, 2015

One Page Template, Multiple Languages

Today, I'd like to share with you a little secret about Scroll Translations. It’s the Confluence add-on which lets you manage Confluence content in multiple languages within a single space. This makes it simple to add page translations. But how about page templates and blueprints? Does the same apply to them? The answer is yes. It's not only possible to create multilingual page templates – it’s easy. In this blogpost, I'll show you how to modify the troubleshooting blueprint (or any other page template) and make it speak in foreign tongues.

Migrating Legacy Content - Best Practices for Importing HTML Pages Into Confluence
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on March 19, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on March 19, 2015

Migrating Legacy Content - Best Practices for Importing HTML Pages Into Confluence

Bringing people together in a collaboration platform like Atlassian Confluence also means transferring your legacy content from multiple information silos. These repositories often contain important information that you can’t afford to leave by the wayside when building a new corporate knowledge base. In many cases, legacy content is only available as HTML files, such as online help resources or intranet pages. Is there a way to bring these assets into Confluence efficiently? Yes – but there is no one-size-fits-all method. There are three main approaches to importing a collection of static HTML pages. Your individual needs will determine which is best for you.

Building a Glossary and Checking Terminology in Confluence
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on March 13, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on March 13, 2015

Building a Glossary and Checking Terminology in Confluence

What would you call the image on the right? A ‘drop-down list’? A ‘pull-down’ or ‘select list’? A ‘drop-box’? I recently discussed this very issue with one of our Atlassian Expert consultants. It seems everyone – from customers to consultants, developers and tech writers – has their own name for this UI element. We constantly refer to it in meetings, specs and technical documentation, but often do so in different ways. Consistent wording is key to delivering clear, readable documentation. But when larger groups of authors collaborate to write documentation, they tend to use different words for the same things – such as jargon, or incorrect or obsolete terms. This is where terminology management comes to the rescue. This blog post describes how you can build a glossary in Confluence to ensure terminology consistency. What’s more, I’ll show you a way to check your Confluence content for terminology and writing style.

Context is King - Four Royal Tips on Providing Context-Sensitive Help in Confluence
Nils Bier

Nils Bier on March 6, 2015

Nils Bier

Nils Bier on March 6, 2015

Context is King - Four Royal Tips on Providing Context-Sensitive Help in Confluence

A king would never walk to the library if he wanted to consult a book. Rather than climbing down from his throne, he’d tell one of his servants to find the desired volume and bring it to him, wherever it may be. Today, all users are treated like royalty in the sense that they have instant access to information of all kinds. Context-sensitive help does the job of the king’s servants – providing the required knowledge directly and conveniently, and sparing users the bother of interrupting their work to browse through the entire help library. Imagine that a user needs advice on which option in a dialog window to choose. Clicking the help button or pressing the F1 key pulls up the relevant help topic right away. To be truly useful, help content must be provided at the right time and in the right form. And when it comes to creating and distributing help resources, what could be better than Confluence, the collaborative, web-based knowledge platform? Here are four tips for providing context-sensitive online help fit for a king.

Confluence 5.7: Inline Comments vs. Page Comments
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on February 25, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on February 25, 2015

Confluence 5.7: Inline Comments vs. Page Comments

Confluence 5.7 is the first release to boast inline comment functionality. The entire Confluence user community – including ourselves here at K15t Software – instantly fell in love with this new way to close the content feedback loop. But can inline comments be used for questions and feedback on public documentation sites? Or are comment threads below pages still the best way to interact? This key issue was recently discussed on the Atlassian Confluence documentation site. Here’s a wrap-up of that discussion https://confluence.atlassian.com/display/DOC/Supported+Platforms?focusedCommentId=712639181#comment-712639181 – plus some best practices for using inline comments or choosing (threaded) page comments in Confluence 5.7.

Scroll Viewport 2.0 - Simplified User Interface and Powerful New Features
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on February 17, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on February 17, 2015

Scroll Viewport 2.0 - Simplified User Interface and Powerful New Features

When we first released Scroll Viewport on the Atlassian Marketplace in 2013, we claimed it was the best way to publish from Confluence to the web. Since then, we’ve learned a great deal from numerous website projects – and as a result, we’ve reconsidered the whole concept and spent many hours working on developments. Now, we’re proud to present Scroll Viewport 2.0 – a Confluence add-on that's a framework for delivering Confluence content even simpler and faster to the web.

Search and Replace in Confluence
Nils Bier

Nils Bier on January 29, 2015

Nils Bier

Nils Bier on January 29, 2015

Search and Replace in Confluence

When creating and updating documentation, it is often necessary to search for and replace text fragments. If, for example, a product name changes, authors need to update every single occurrence within their documentation. What if there was a way to automate this process? Atlassian Confluence’s built-in editor features a handy search-and-replace tool. Unfortunately, it doesn’t offer a way to exchange strings on multiple pages, across spaces or throughout the entire collaboration platform – and it’s unlikely that such a feature will be added any time soon. Instead, Confluence’s product managers point us to the Atlassian Marketplace, where third-party developers can provide suitable add-ons. In this blog post, I’ll take a closer look at one solution – available for Confluence 5 and above – that will help you search and replace Confluence content like a pro.

Putting It On the Table - Managing Tabular Content in Confluence
Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on January 15, 2015

Martin Häberle

Martin Häberle on January 15, 2015

Putting It On the Table - Managing Tabular Content in Confluence

In medieval times, merchants used an Exchequer table to perform calculations for taxes and goods – and tables have been considered the best way to compile and compare data ever since. Tables can display large volumes of structured information in a highly compact and logical way. And today, spreadsheets enable us to calculate and process data electronically. Technical communicators rely on tables and comparison matrices to provide their readers with value-added information. So when using Atlassian Confluence to manage and distribute documentation, they need to be able to create tabular data, too. But Confluence is a collaboration platform and wiki, and wasn’t specifically built to handle complex tables or manage spreadsheet calculations. So can it be used to build, manage, style and calculate tabular content with ease?    

Webinar - How CA Technologies Broke the Rules - The DocOps Approach to Agile Technical Content
Nils Bier

Nils Bier on December 19, 2014

Nils Bier

Nils Bier on December 19, 2014

Webinar - How CA Technologies Broke the Rules - The DocOps Approach to Agile Technical Content

On December 16, James Turcotte, SVP, Business Unit Executive of CA Technologies, gave a presentation on how Computer Associates keeps product documentation updated and improves turn-over time. In this presentation, James coined the term DocOps, describing it as the sibling of DevOps. Support agents, developers and, of course, technical communicators cooperate to deliver value to the customer. They do this by continuously improving documentation and knowledge management, even after release. We are delighted that our very own Scroll Versions enabled them to manage their content in Confluence.

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